Voice Disorders

Voice Disorders

A voice disorder consists of changes in pitch, loudness, and vocal quality. A person with a voice disorder typically sounds hoarse, breathy, nasally or de-nasally, with either high or low pitch, or sounds like you are talking too loudly or softly.  An SLP evaluates your voice and how you use it. The SLP will help you practice and retain good voice habits by working on the right pitch, loudness, and voice quality. 82% of outpatient voice clients showed improvements with SLP intervention (ASHA)

What does a voice disorder sound like?

  • Hoarse or breathy
  • Nasally or de-nasally
  • Problems with pitch
  • Talking too loudly or softly

What can an SLP do for voice disorders?

An SLP evaluates your voice and how you use it. The SLP will help you practice and retain good voice habits by working on the right pitch, loudness, and voice quality. (82% of outpatient voice clients showed improvements with SLP intervention (ASHA)

Stuttering

Stuttered speech often includes repetitions of words or parts of words, as well as prolongations of speech sound, which can impede communication when caused too frequently. A person with a stutter typically experiences being tense or out of breath when talking, stopped or blocked sounds, interjections such as “um”, “like,” or “uh” that delay words or the speaker appears to be stuck on, and prolonged sounds when talking. An SLP can help the patient establish fluency in their speech, communicate more effectively by monitoring/controlling the rate the patient speaks, participate in normal everyday activities, control and maintain breathing.cies,” which can impede communication when caused too frequently.

Signs of Stuttering:

  • Appearing tense or out of breath when talking
  • Stopped or blocked sounds
  • Interjections such as “um”, “like,” or “uh” that delay words or the speaker appears to be stuck on.
  • Prolonged sounds when talking

How can an SLP help with Stuttering: By noting the severity of the disorder and the impact on the patient’s daily life, an SLP can:

  • Help the patient establish fluency in their speech
  • Communicate more effectively by monitoring/controlling the rate the patient speaks
  • Participate in normal everyday activities
  • Control and maintain breathing

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